Speech Events

  • ORIGINAL ORATORY (OO)

    Original Oratory is a ten minute speech written to alert the audience to an issue or danger facing society, to strengthen devotion to an accepted cause, or to eulogize a person.  Orators are expected to research and speak intelligently, with a degree of originality, in an interesting manner, and with some profit to the audience, about a topic of significance.  An orator is given free choice of subject and judged solely on the effectiveness of development and presentation.   Students perform for up to 10 minutes.

           

    Example of Original Oratory

     

     

    MEMORIZED PUBLIC ADDRESS (MPA)

    Memorized Public Address is a two-part event designed to highlight a previously given speech.  It is comprised of an introductory analysis written by the competitor (comprising at least 20% of the total speech)  and quoted material from any one speech given to the public throughout history (comprising the remaining ~80% of the total speech).   Competitors find a speech (i.e. Ted Talks, commencement addresses, testimonies, etc.) and then write an accompanying introduction.   Students perform for up to 10 minutes.

     

    INFORMATIVE SPEAKING (INF)

    Informative speaking is a ten minute speech written to enlighten or educate the audience about any one subject.  Props (such as posters) are allowed and are commonly used in this event, but they are by no means mandatory.  Competitors may choose to write about any subject that interests them.   Students perform for up to 10 minutes.

     

    Serious Oral Interpretation (SOI)

    SOI is comprised of selections or cuttings from a single published literary work (with an ISBN number), i.e. one novel, one short story, one play, one monologue, or one or more poems.  The contestant must name their piece and its author at some point during their presentation.  Contestants memorize their selections and perform them without the use of any props or costumes.  SOI is serious in nature, and requires talent in acting and characterization.   Students perform for up to 10 minutes.

     

    Example of SOI

     

    Humorous Oral Interpretation HOI

    HOI is comprised of selections or cuttings from a single published literary work (with an ISBN number), i.e. one novel, one short story, one play, one monologue, or one or more poems.  The contestant must name their piece and its author at some point during their presentation.  Contestants memorize their selections and perform them without the use of any props or costumes.  HOI is humorous in nature, and requires talent in acting and characterization.   Students perform for up to 10 minutes.

     

    Example of HOI

     

    Duo Interpretation (Duo)

    Duo is unique in that it is the only speech event where two people work as partners.   In  Duo Interpretation, each of the two performers may play one or more characters.  They may not make eye contact with each other or touch during their piece.  It is comprised of selections or cuttings from a single published literary work (with an ISBN number), i.e. one novel, one short story, one play, one monologue, or one or more poems.  The contestant must name their piece and its author at some point during their presentation.  Contestants memorize their selections and perform them without the use of any props or costumes.  Duo can be either serious or humorous in nature, and requires talent in acting and characterization.  Students perform for up to 10 minutes.

           

    Example of Duo

     

    IMPROMPTU

    Impromptu Speaking is a short-prep event designed to demonstrate the competitors' speaking skills, improvisational ability, and their capability to draw critical conclusions and design a speech based off of a prompt.  Impromptu Speaking is ultimately a test of a student’s ability to analyze and organize information and of his/her speaking ability.  The topics are quotations/cartoons that show the author’s specific ideas on cultural, moral, or social issues.  Students speak for up to 5 minutes

     

    EXTEMPORANEOUS

    Extemporaneous Speaking is a short-prep event designed to demonstrate the competitors' speaking skills, improvising ability, and knowledge and understanding of current events.  Competitors draw three questions regarding current events, select one, and then have 30 minutes to prepare a speech in response.  The contestant utilizes files of published materials (books, magazines, newspapers, online sources) s/he has compiled as a resource for answering the question.  At the completion of the 30 minute preparation period, the student speaks on the topic for up to 7 minutes.

     

    Debate Events

    POLICY

    Debaters work in pairs (teams) to address the school year’s topic, either from the affirmative side (to propose a plan to solve a problem with the topic), or the negative side (to prove how the affirmative’s plan is flawed). Argumentation includes a constructive case, cross-examination, and refutation. Skills learned include research, policy analysis, case building, refutation, questioning, organization and communication.

    The 2018-2019 Policy Topic is: Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially reduce its restrictions on legal immigration to the United States.

     

    PUBLIC FORUM

    Public Forum Debate is an audience friendly debate. Two pairs (teams) debate controversial topics (which change monthly) ripped from newspaper headlines. Rounds begin with a coin toss between the competing teams to determine side and order (Pro-Con or Con-Pro). Public Forum tests skills in argumentation, cross-examination, and refutation.

     

     

    LEGISLATIVE

    This is individual debate in a large group setting. Legislative Debate models the legislative process of democracy, specifically, the United States Congress. Students optionally write legislation submitted by their coach to a tournament, and they research the docket of bills and resolutions distributed by each tournament. At the tournament, students set an agenda of what legislation to discuss, they debate the merits and disadvantages of each, and they vote to pass or defeat the measures they have examined

    LINCOLN DOUGLAS

    Lincoln Douglas Debate centers on a proposition of value, which concerns itself with what ought to be instead of what is. A value is an ideal held by individuals, societies, governments, etc. One debater upholds each side of the resolution from a value perspective. To that end, no plan (or counterplan) should be offered. A plan is defined  as a formalized, comprehensive proposal for implementation. The debate should focus on logical reasoning to support a general principle instead of particular plans and counterplans. Debaters may offer generalized, practical examples or solutions to illustrate how the general principle could guide decisions. Topics change every two months