Classes Offered

  • Course Title: World Geography: Eastern Hemisphere
    Credit: .50 per Semester
    Length: 1 Semester
    Level: 9,10,11,12
    Prerequisite: None
    Course Description: Using the five themes of geography, World Geography: Eastern Hemisphere explores the world’s eastern region including Asia, Africa, and the Pacific (excluding Europe). Students develop the language and tools necessary to understand our world. This course investigates the natural environments, histories, and cultures that combine to create unique locations in our world. Additionally, current events broaden our global perspective and illustrate our interconnectedness in the 21st  Century.
     
     
    Course Title: World Geography: Western Hemisphere
    Credit: .50 per Semester
    Length: 1 Semester
    Level: 9,10,11,12
    Prerequisite: None
    Course Description: Using the five themes of geography, World Geography: Western Hemisphere explores the world’s western region including Europe and Russia. Students develop the language and tools necessary to understand our world. This course investigates the natural environments, histories, and cultures that combine to create unique locations in our world. Additionally, current events broaden our global perspective and illustrate our interconnectedness in the 21st  Century.
     
     
    Course Title: U.S. Government and The Political Economy
    Credit: .50 per Semester
    Length: 1 Year
    Level:  12
    Prerequisite: None 
    Course Description: Government and the U. S. Political Economy empower students to be effective, responsible citizens. Students examine principles central to U. S. government and economics, explore the structure of national and local governments, and investigate the dynamic world of political-economic life.
     
    Course Title: AP U.S. Government and The Political Economy
    Credit: .50 per Semester
    Length: 1 Year
    Level: 12
    Prerequisite: US History 
    Course Description: AP United States Government and the Political Economy explores the historical origins of the American political system and the links among people, their government, and the institutions of United States Government. This rigorous course covers the process and products of national policymaking. To enable students to earn college credit in political science by passing a national exam, AP Government uses a college text, scholarly readings, and political research. Students engage in demanding activities including reading, researching, writing, note taking, group and individual projects, focused, seminar-style class discussions, and dialogue with speakers on important political issues.
     
    Course Title: Montana: People and Issues
    Credit: .50 per Semester
    Length: 1 Semester
    Level: 9,10,11,12
    Prerequisite: None
    Course Description: Montana: People and Issues surveys state history with special emphasis on Montana Native American cultures and current issues. Students develop and use a variety of skills to access, organize, analyze, apply, present, and report information about Montana. Students explore current events and issues and their connection to Montana history. Students engage in a variety of learning experiences including note taking, research, oral histories, individual and group projects, guest speakers, presentations (including multimedia), simulation exercises, debates, and performance tasks.
     
    Course Title: U.S. History: World War 1 to Present
    Credit: .50 per Semester
    Length: 1 Year
    Level: 11
    Prerequisite: None
    Course Description: This course surveys United States history with an emphasis on the 20th  century. The focus of this course is to stress the democratic ideals that shaped our country, the responsible citizenship that sustains us, the cultural diversity that enriches us, the global perspective that we need in an ever-changing world, and the economic connections that impact our lives. Students develop and use a variety of skills including accessing, organizing, analyzing, applying, presenting (oral and written), and reporting information in the context of course content. Students engage in note taking, research, individual and group projects, presentations (including multimedia), simulation exercises, debates, and performance tasks.
     
    Course Title: AP U.S. History
    Credit: .50 per Semester
    Length: 1 Year
    Level: 11,12
    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
    Course Description: AP United States History provides students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history. The course prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students learn to assess historical materials for relevance to given interpretive problems, reliability, and importance. Students develop the skills to arrive at conclusions on the basis of informed judgments and to present evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format. In addition to exposing students to the historical content listed above, the AP course trains students to analyze and interpret primary sources, including documentary material, maps, statistical tables, and pictorial and graphic evidence of historical events.
     
    Course Title: U.S. History/English 3
    Credit: .50 per Semester
    Length: 1 Year
    Level: 11
    Prerequisite: English 2
    Course Description: This class allows students to see the interconnection between American history and American literature. It surveys U.S. history with an emphasis on the 20th  Century. The class explores the democratic ideas that shaped us, the responsible citizenship that sustains us, the cultural diversity that enriches us, and the global perspectives needed in an everchanging world. Economic issues and current affairs are woven into the class. Students will use develop a variety of skills including researching, accessing, organizing, analyzing, and presenting information orally and in written form. Students will take notes, complete projects, take part in simulations, and engage in debate and discussions.
     
    Course Title: Sociology and Criminology
    Credit: .50 per Semester
    Length: 1 Semester
    Level: 10,11,12
    Prerequisite: None
    Course Description: In Sociology and Criminology, students study human social behavior from a group perspective, including recurring patterns of attitudes and actions and how these patterns vary across time, among cultures, and in social groups. This emphasis on sociology provides students the background needed to grasp the concepts of criminology: crime, criminals, courts, and corrections. Criminology explores alternative behaviors and lifestyles that evolve out of the mainstream to contradict the norm. Guest speakers and field trips add vitality to the course. Students also participate in role playing and simulations. They create multimedia projects, read, take notes, and do research.
     
    Course Title: Psychology
    Credit: .50 per Semester
    Length: 1 Semster
    Level: 10,11,12
    Prerequisite: None
    Course Description: Psychology begins the student’s exploration into the science of human behavior. Designed to help students explore who they are and what motivates them and others, this class investigates how people develop thinking patterns and why some act abnormally. Varied instructional strategies include uses of video-related materials, experiments, case studies, critical thinking skill development, multimedia projects, and collaborative teaching methods. The course provides a rich experience for students of all abilities. Students gain a greater appreciation of their own abilities, see how these abilities differ from those of others, and learn the fascination of complex humanity.
     
    Course Title: World Issues
    Credit: .50 per Semester
    Length: 1 Semester
    Level: 11,12
    Prerequisite: None 
    Course Description: Through exploration of current issues, students will increase their understanding of contemporary affairs. In an increasingly global and complex world it becomes imperative that citizens are informed about the causes and consequences of world events. The course stresses the responsibility of students to fellow humans and the environment in our interdependent world. The teaching methods include journal writing, papers, oral presentations, research, group activities, book critiques, and multimedia projects.
     
    Course Title: Modern World History
    Credit: .50 per Semester
    Length: 1 Year
    Level: 9,10,11,12
    Prerequisite: None
    Course Description: Modern World History examines major turning points in the shaping of the modern world, from the late eighteenth century to the present. The course will emphasize the growing interdependence of people and cultures throughout the world. Students investigate the roles that geography, religion, culture, and politics play in the shaping of modern civilization. Students explore political, economic, and social systems of the last two centuries. They investigate current issues in order to integrate events of the past to contemporary affairs. Students participate in a variety of learning experiences including note taking, group projects, research, multi-media presentations, simulation exercises, and role playing. Classes integrate literature and the fine arts with the study of history.
     
    Course Title: AP World History
    Credit: .50 per Semester
    Length: 1 Year
    Level: 9,10,11,12
    Prerequisite: None
    Course Description: This Advanced Placement (AP) World History course provides students with rigorous investigation into the historical past from 8000 B.C.E. to the present with a focus on historical thinking skills, five key themes in World History, and 19 key concepts. Although not a requirement, students may obtain college credit for this course by taking the national A.P. Exam in May.