Trimester 1 Learning Standards

  • Reading Foundational Skills

    RF 3.3 Know and apply grade level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words. 

    RF 3.4a Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension 

    Reading Literature

    RL 3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 

    RL 3.2 Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures, including those by and about American Indians, determine the central message lesson or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. 

    RL 3.3 Describe characters in a story (their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events 

    RL 3.9 Compare and contrast the themes, settings and plots of stories written by the same author, including american indian authors, about the same or similar characters (books in a series)

    Reading Informational 

    RI 3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

    RI 3.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

    RI 3.7 Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).

    Writing 

    W 3.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.

    W 3.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

    W 3.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details and clear even sequences

    W 3.4 With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose 

    W 3.7 Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic. Include sources and/or topics by and about American Indians.

    W 3.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflections and rvision) and shorter time frames, (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific purposes and audiences

    Speaking and Listening 

    SL 3.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (1:1, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly 

    SL 3.2 Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally

    Language

    L 3.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard english grammar and usage when writing or speaking

    L 3.2 Demonstrate command of standard english capitalization, punctuation and spelling when writing

    L 3.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading or listening 

    L 3.6 Acquire and use accurately grade appropriate conversational, general academic, and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal spatial and temporal relationships (After dinner that night we went looking for them) 

    Math 

    NBT 2 Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction

    OA 3.1 Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

    OA 3.2 Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.

    OA 3.4 Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 × ? = 48, 5 = _ ÷ 3, 6 × 6 = ?

    OA 3.5 Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide. ( Note: Students need not use formal terms for these properties.) Examples: If 6 × 4 = 24 is known, then 4 × 6 = 24 is also known. (Commutative property of multiplication.) 3 × 5 × 2 can be found by 3 × 5 = 15, then 15 × 2 = 30, or by 5 × 2 = 10, then 3 × 10 = 30. (Associative property of multiplication.) Knowing that 8 × 5 = 40 and 8 × 2 = 16, one can find 8 × 7 as 8 × (5 + 2) = (8 × 5) + (8 × 2) = 40 + 16 = 56. (Distributive property.)

    OA 3.7 Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.

     

Trimester 2 Learning Standards

  • Reading Foundational Skills

    RF 3.3 Know and apply grade level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words. 

    RF 3.4a Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension 

    Reading Literature

    RL 3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 

    RL 3.2 Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures, including those by and about American Indians, determine the central message lesson or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. 

    RL 3.3 Describe characters in a story (their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events 

    Reading Informational 

    RI 3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

    RI 3.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

    RI 3.7 Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).

    Writing 

    W 3.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.

    W 3.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

    W 3.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details and clear even sequences

    W 3.4 With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose 

    W 3.7 Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic. Include sources and/or topics by and about American Indians.

    W 3.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflections and rvision) and shorter time frames, (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific purposes and audiences

    Speaking and Listening 

    SL 3.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (1:1, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly 

    SL 3.2 Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally

    Language

    L 3.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard english grammar and usage when writing or speaking

    L 3.2 Demonstrate command of standard english capitalization, punctuation and spelling when writing

    L 3.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading or listening 

    L 3.6 Acquire and use accurately grade appropriate conversational, general academic, and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal spatial and temporal relationships (After dinner that night we went looking for them) 

    Math 

    OA 3.1 Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

    OA 3.2 Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.

    OA 3.3 Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

    OA 3.4 Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 × ? = 48, 5 = _ ÷ 3, 6 × 6 = ?

    OA 3.5 Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide. ( Note: Students need not use formal terms for these properties.) Examples: If 6 × 4 = 24 is known, then 4 × 6 = 24 is also known. (Commutative property of multiplication.) 3 × 5 × 2 can be found by 3 × 5 = 15, then 15 × 2 = 30, or by 5 × 2 = 10, then 3 × 10 = 30. (Associative property of multiplication.) Knowing that 8 × 5 = 40 and 8 × 2 = 16, one can find 8 × 7 as 8 × (5 + 2) = (8 × 5) + (8 × 2) = 40 + 16 = 56. (Distributive property.)

    3.MD.5 Recognize area as an attribute of plane figures and understand concepts of area measurement. 1. A square with side length 1 unit, called “a unit square,” is said to have “one square unit” of area, and can be used to measure area. 2. A plane figure which can be covered without gaps or overlaps by n unit squares is said to have an area of n square units.

    3.MD.7  Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition.

Trimester 3 Learning Standards

  • Reading Foundational Skills

    RF 3.3 Know and apply grade level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words. 

    RF 3.4a Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension 

    Reading Literature

    RL 3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 

    RL 3.2 Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures, including those by and about American Indians, determine the central message lesson or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. 

    RL 3.3 Describe characters in a story (their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events 

    Reading Informational 

    RI 3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

    RI 3.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

    RI 3.7 Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).

    Writing 

    W 3.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons. 

    W 3.4 With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose 

    W 3.7 Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic. Include sources and/or topics by and about American Indians.

    W 3.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflections and rvision) and shorter time frames, (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific purposes and audiences

    Speaking and Listening 

    SL 3.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (1:1, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly 

    SL 3.2 Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally

    Language

    L 3.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard english grammar and usage when writing or speaking

    L 3.2 Demonstrate command of standard english capitalization, punctuation and spelling when writing

    L 3.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading or listening 

    L 3.6 Acquire and use accurately grade appropriate conversational, general academic, and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal spatial and temporal relationships (After dinner that night we went looking for them) 

    Math 

    NF 3.1 Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b. Grade 3 expectations in this domain are limited to fractions with denominators 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8.

    NF 3.3 Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size. Grade 3 expectations in this domain are limited to fractions with denominators 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8.

    3.MD.1 Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram.

    3.MD.2 Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l).1 Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.

    3.MD.4Generate measurement data by measuring lengths using rulers marked with halves and fourths of an inch. Show the data by making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked off in appropriate units-whole numbers, halves, or quarters.

    3.MD.5 Recognize area as an attribute of plane figures and understand concepts of area measurement. 1. A square with side length 1 unit, called “a unit square,” is said to have “one square unit” of area, and can be used to measure area. 2. A plane figure which can be covered without gaps or overlaps by n unit squares is said to have an area of n square units.

    3.MD.7  Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition.

    3.G.1 Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombuses, rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g., having four sides), and that the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g., quadrilaterals). Recognize rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals, and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories.